Workers & Economic Inequality

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Are Student Debt Forgiveness Scams The Next Mortgage Meltdown?

The student debt epidemic has become an increasingly serious issue, so large that some agencies believe that student debt forgiveness scams are soon to become the next mortgage meltdown. With student loan debt now at $1.2 trillion, borrowers are becoming so desperate that they are vulnerable to scammers who offer debt relief. Casey Quinlan's article in Think Progress cites Sam Adler-Bell's experience of being targeted by one of these companies himself. 

“When they’re already really freaked out because they’re in default and they’re otherwise distressed … Given those circumstances, the first thing that’s going to come up when they Google, both the ads and the actual non-ad results, are for-profit companies and not the department of education’s own walk-through of how to consolidate your loans. It’s totally understandable how people are falling for these scams,” Adler-Bell said.

Read Quinlan's full article that features Adler-Bell.

Tags: student loans, low-income students, for profit colleges, debt

Concentrated poverty is the new urban panic

An article published in Al Jazeera America cites Paul Jargowsky's "Architecture of Segregation" report, asking whether it is best to address concentrated poverty by breaking up distressed neighborhoods or attempting to fix them. The author concludes that relocation is not the answer.

Not well known to those who live in other neighborhoods are the many residents who devote their time to helping neighbors and working for change. Our policies need to support and reward that work. We must invest in decent schools and services, demand more respectful and effective policing and through media coverage, educational materials and public meetings actively challenge racist stereotypes that have caused generations of damage to our people and our cities.

Read the full article from Susan Greenbaum in Al Jazeera America.

Tags: neighborhood integration, low-income housing, high-poverty neighborhoods, concentrated poverty

Is It Time for a Civil-Rights Movement for the Poor?

Like so many before her, Atlantic reporter Alana Semuels asks "What is to be done?" in response to alleviating the financial burdens put on the poor. She discusses the effects that poverty has on housing, schools, higher education, and the workforce naming TCF senior fellow Rick Kahlenberg's latest work—a critique and expansion of Robert Putnam's book Our Kids—throughout the article. She quotes Kahlenberg saying:

“If you look back at the last 50 years, I think one of the things we can be most proud of is the civil-rights revolution and the way that it changed our country for the better in really profound ways,” he told me. “At the same time, we’ve seen our economic divide grow much worse than it was a half century ago. So it seems to me there may be some lessons from the policies adopted as a result of the civil-rights movement in housing and education and employment that could be applied to our economic situation.”

Read Semuels's Atlantic full article here.

Tags: income inequality, housing segregation, higher education, class segregation

Syracuse has highest rates of poverty among blacks and Hispanics in U.S.

TCF fellow Paul Jargowsky's research on segregation was used in an article by a Syracuse University student writing for the Daily Orange, Syracuse's independent student news organizations. The author, Hanna Horvath, cites Jargowsky's research, saying that these high rates of poverty take a toll on all aspects of community life, including education. 

Read Horvath's article from the Daily Orange here.

Tags: segregation, neighborhood integration, concentrated poverty

Whose Neighborhood Is It?

A recent op-ed by Thomas Edsall published in the New York Times describes the swell of racial integration within communities, which eventually hit their "tipping point" at which point segregation set in. Edsall's explanation is a lead up to citing TCF fellow Paul Jargowsky's report on the "architecture of segregation" and how the nation is seeing a resurgence of racially segregated neighborhoods. Esall says:

Residential and public school integration remain an immense challenge. Affordable housing, one piece of the integrative process, got a boost from a favorable Supreme Court decision in June, Texas Department of Housing, that further empowers plaintiffs in housing discrimination cases. A second boost came from new HUD regulations issued in July requiring local governments “to take significant actions to overcome historic patterns of segregation, achieve truly balanced and integrated living patterns, promote fair housing choice, and foster inclusive communities."

Read the full op-ed on neighborhood segregation.

Tags: segregation, neighborhood integration, concentrated poverty


Workers & Economic Inequality

Workers & Economic Inequality

In recent decades, and especially since 2000, the richest Americans have enjoyed soaring income and wealth while the rest of the population's living standards have stagnated. The Century Foundation was one of the first institutions to raise serious concerns about these trends and propose ideas for improving economic conditions for all Americans- not just the fortunate few.

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